Luneta, 2012

Luneta, 12/24/12.

Luneta, 12/24/12.

“THE LITTLE CRESCENT”

by Sophie Echivarre

A little crescent moon sits in the middle of a bustling metropolis.
It has seen many people, many days and things. It contains Manila’s
Kilometer Zero, from which all distances in the Pearl of the Orient,
are measured, a monument to a man who would have preferred a more
simple grave.

Long before the Pearl had felt the yoke of the conqueror and had its
sons and daughters sacrificed in the altar of freedom, a band of
Westerners arrived on native shores using a native map. It was on
that map that this crescent moon was clearly marked but visibly
nameless. It was christened Luneta, which means “little moon” in their
native Castillian.

It was little more than a field at that time and nobody would know it
would turn into an execution site, a park and a tourist destination.

Centuries after it was named, a man was sent to Luneta to be martyred
for neither cross nor crime but for country. He was taken out of
Fort Santiago to this place early in the morning. He remarked, “Oh,
what a beautiful morning!” and went casually to death. He finally
arrived at the place and without further ado, he was shot. The
monument, Manila’s Kilometer zero, was for him.

Today, Luneta is a park where people meet friends and look at the
monument to Rizal. This moon that has seen many people and days
defines the country. Without it, what would the Philippines be?

The author.

The author.